Got Questions?

Frequently Asked Questions

The amount of water your tree needs depends on tree size, tree species, soil, and weather. In other words, there’s no simple answer. A soil moisture meter is an inexpensive and effective way to check how wet the tree’s root zone is, which lets you know if you need to water more or less.

Many tree species will tolerate pruning during about any time of the year. The biggest exception is tree species that are targeted by pests or disease only during a certain time of the year. For example, the lilac ash borer is attracted to fresh wounds on ash trees only for about 5 weeks in the spring, so if one of our customers needs their ash tree pruned, we make sure it doesn’t get scheduled when the borers are looking for trees to infest.

There are lots of trees that do well in Utah Valley. One important thing to consider when you are selecting a tree is the tree’s size at maturity. We see too many big trees planted under powerlines or in small areas that need to be removed because they become a hazard. Redbuds, paperbark maple, and golden rain trees are all trees that do well in our climate and stay relatively small. Frontier elm, fringe tree, catalpa, chitalpa, and bur oak trees can grow to an impressive size and also grow well here. 

The top three pieces of advice I give for taking care of your trees are:
 
1) Mulch. Removing grass around the trunk of the tree and replacing it with a wood chip mulch keeps the lawn mower and weed wacker from damaging the tree and promotes beneficial soil microbes that help the tree absorb nutrients through its roots.
 
2) Don’t get the trunk wet. Trees have evolved to keep the trunk relatively dry. When the trunk gets wet from sprinklers, it weakens the bark and promotes disease and pest infections. 
 
3) Read before you prune. Pruning too much at a time, or making cuts not at certain points on a branch will actually cause a stress response in the tree that sends out lots of very fast growing shoots. Not only does this essentially undo what you just pruned, but these new shoots are weak and often break when they get bigger. 
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